Atwater Village

Atwater Village

 

Atwater Village is a neighborhood in northeastern Los Angeles that is located next to the Los Angeles river and is known for it's abundant plant species and wildlife.  The neighborhood shares borders with the neighborhoods of Silver Lake to the south, Elysian Valley to the southeast, Glassell Park to the northeast, and Los Feliz and Griffith Park across the river to the west. Much of Atwater lies in the old river flood plain, which has resulted in in the region having deep, fertile soil.

Atwater Village began as a part of Rancho San Rafael, which covered much of what is now Glendale and northeastern Los Angeles. In 1868, W.C.B. Richardson purchased a portion of the rancho and renamed it Rancho Santa Eulalia. In 1902 this land was eventually subdivided and some subdivisions offered for sale to prospective homebuilders. The subdivision that stretched from the Southern Pacific tracks to the Los Angeles River was eventually named Atwater Tract for its proximity to the river – "at-water". The area would later be known as "Atwater" with the word "Village" added in 1986.  Atwater Village really sprang up in the 1920s and 30s because of its prime location between Los Angeles and Glendale. The oldest standing establishment in Atwater Village, and one of the oldest restaurants in Los Angeles County, is the historic Tam O'Shanter Inn

Atwater Village's main attraction has always been it's lush, verdant scenery and it has a large abundancy of bird species including Snowy Egret, Thick-billed Parrot, Common Raven, White Pelican and the Osprey.  Atwater Village also has an abundance of fish, amphibians, and crustaceans which are located in the river.  The area also has a large population of mammals and reptiles which include Mule Deer, Coyote, Mountain LionBlack Bear and North American Beaver.

In early January, 2013, it was announced that the Army Corps of Engineers is working on a restoration and access plan for the concrete channel that traverses the neighborhood and local officials are planning to open a portion in Atwater Village for a multitude of public activities. An area near the Sepulveda Basin has been open to kayaking tours for the past few years and the new plans focus on a five-mile stretch in the Glendale Narrows, starting at the North Atwater Park and running south to Elysian Valley.  This plan calls for "non-motorized boating, hiking and fishing" from May 27 to September 2.