Jefferson Park/Lafayette Square Historic Area

Jefferson Park/Lafayette Square Historic Area

Often referred to by locals as “The Bungalows", the Jefferson Park neighborhood is perhaps one of Los Angeles's finest examples of both an early street car suburb, and the proliferation of the Arts and Crafts movement of the early 1900s, in the form of simple, yet elegant, single-story bungalows for the growing middle class. Fanciful eaves, intricate wood work, turrets, stone, masonry and shingle are displayed in ways that defy the modest scale of these houses and make the many streets of this vast district instantly charming.  A significant number of Jefferson Park houses were built using prefabricated kits or plan books produced by the likes of Sears and Pacific Ready-Cut HomesIn addition to its celebrated architecture, Jefferson Park has long embodied the ethnic and cultural diversity for which Los Angeles is known. Upon the elimination of racially restrictive covenants in the 1940's, Jefferson Park found instant favor with African American and Japanese American families and while the neighborhood demographics today are substantially more diverse, many of the business and institutions along Adams and Jefferson Boulevards and Western Avenue, within the HPOZ, reflect the contributions of these predominant communities.

 

Lafayette Square was the last and greatest of banker George L. Crenshaw’s ten residential developments in the city of Los Angeles. Since Crenshaw wanted this development to have a European flair it was designed as an elegant residential park centered on St. Charles Place, a broad palm-lined avenue with a landscaped median. Early residents of Lafayette Square included the founder of Pepperdine University, George Pepperdine, actors W.C. Fields and Fatty Arbuckle, art collector Norton Simon, boxer Joe Louis, and the Crenshaw family. Houses in Lafayette Square reflect residential styles popular during the 1910's and 1920's such as Craftsman, Italianate, Spanish Colonial Revival, and American Colonial Revival. Several houses, such as architect Paul Williams’ own home, were designed in the Modern style, exemplifying an important trend in Los Angeles’ architectural development.  Most of the properties have period details: Juliet balconies, mahogany staircases and libraries, sitting rooms, stained glass windows, triple crown molding, soaring ceilings—even four-car garages.

 

 

*Please note that the MLS/Claw does not categorize Historic Districts and, as such, some properties may be listed that are adjacent to the HPOZ neighborhoods or in the same zip code.  Please feel free to contact us with any questions you have regarding the historic status of a home.

Recognizing the need to identify and protect neighborhoods with distinct architectural and cultural resources, the City of Los Angeles has developed an expansive program of Historic Preservation Overlay Zones (HPOZs). HPOZs, commonly known as historic districts, provide for review of proposed exterior alterations and additions to historic properties within designated districts. 

For more information please visit http://www.preservation.lacity.org/hpoz